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Medicine changes rapidly, but you can always count on Journal of Clinical Pathways for the latest information on value-based care.
As organizations new to pathways look to develop their processes, it is highly beneficial to examine the foundations used by leaders within each therapeutic area of interest.
New drugs for orphan and rare diseases have the potential to positively impact the lives of patients where historically few or no treatments had been available to manage the disease.
Using clinical pathways to direct exactly where and when care can be best provided is critical to population health management success.
Annual updates to formulary exclusion lists suggest a need for careful evaluation by benefit sponsors, clinicians, patient advocacy groups, and the pharmaceutical industry to determine implications on treatment outcomes and achieving value-based care.
For those of us at Journal of Clinical Pathways, September marks our Clinical Pathways Congress, held the weekend of September 8 in Washington, DC. Although the Congress may be our primary focus, it is certainly not the only iron we have in the fire.
For clinical pathways to be most effective, they need to accommodate many external factors impacting patients.
Our annual Clinical Pathways Congress (CPC) will be held in Washington, DC, over the second weekend in September, and we hope to see many of our readers there. We have reached an exciting moment in clinical pathways development.
President Donald J Trump’s selection of Scott Gottlieb, MD, to lead the FDA has ushered in a new direction for the government agency, which is likely to alter the availability and use of pharmaceuticals in the United States.
Between the state of cancer care in America, the continued debate over the country’s health care system, and the best treatment practices for older adults, this issue of Journal of Clinical Pathways presents a broad spectrum of important issues in the field of value-based care.